Categories
Low FODMAP

How to Choose an Everyday Low-FODMAP Bread

Shopping for bread on the low-FODMAP diet can be quite the challenge, especially during the elimination phase. Most store-bought breads are made from ingredients like wheat, barley or rye flour, each of which has a limited serving size. But don’t worry! There are lots of great low-FODMAP breads out there, and I’ll help you choose the one that’s right for you.

In this post, I’ll take you through the state of the state on lab-tested breads, then give you some label reading advice for your next grocery run. And if reading labels sounds as painstaking as we think it might, I’ll also give you a list of low-FODMAP bread products to pluck right off the shelf.

What Does the Lab Say?

The low FODMAP diet is an evolving science. In recent years, many wheat and grain-based products, including bread, have been tested low FODMAP at moderate serves. These include several varieties, such as sourdough (wheat, oat, and spelt-based), millet, corn, wheat wholemeal, multigrain, multigrain sprouted, and white wheat. Each of these varieties has a low-FODMAP serving at one slice.

Learn more by downloading the Monash FODMAP App.

A concern when interpreting the test results of bread is that ingredients and bread descriptions often vary greatly across country lines. It can be challenging to apply the same rules for low-FODMAP breads tested by Monash (an Australia-based company) to the everyday breads we see circulating on our shelves in the US. For example, many US breads contain high fructose corn syrup and fruit juice concentrates, which increases the FODMAP load.

There is also some confusion on what constitutes whole grain versus wholemeal bread and whole wheat vs whole white — as a consumer these descriptions would leave me a little confused. Based on my clinical interpretation white wheat, sourdoughs (aside from rye-based) and several naturally gluten-free breads are low FODMAP at one slice. While rye, whole-wheat, multigrain wheat, high fiber, and oat-based breads are high FODMAP.

What Types of Bread Can I Eat?

Sourdough Bread

While there is some debate on how to choose a gut-friendly sourdough, I often encourage choosing a traditional variety (i.e. made without yeast) and limiting portion to one to two slices per serving.

The best place to find a traditional sourdough bread is at your local bakery or the fresh bread section of the grocer. These fresh made sourdough breads use a starter (a blend of bacteria and wild yeasts) versus baker’s yeast, which results in a slower fermentation process. The little microbes present in the starter actually eat up the majority of the FODMAP-bearing fructans during the longer ferment time, making it easier for many IBS sufferers to digest. The addition of yeast speeds up the fermentation process, which does not allow ample time for the fructans to be digested. 

Tip: Take a look at the ingredient list, and opt for a sourdough bread made without yeast.

Here are a few low-FODMAP sourdough examples that I think are pretty delicious.

Product
The Essential Baking Company Take & Bake Sourdough Bread

Ingredients
Organic Unbleached Wheat Flour, Water, Sea Salt, Organic Barley Malt.

Product
Boudin Bakery Sourdough

Ingredients
Flour, water, salt and a little bit of the original mother dough (a magical combination formed by local varieties of wild yeast—to create a natural source of fermentation that allows Boudin sourdough to rise without using commercial yeast.).

Product
Berlin Natural Bakery Sourdough Spelt Bread

Ingredients
Whole Grain Spelt flour, Water, Sea Salt.

Basic Wheat Bread (small servings)

Feel free to enjoy one slice of your basic white wheat bread – just be sure to watch portions and frequency. Avoid the high fiber, whole grain, rustic varieties, as these are likely higher in FODMAPs.

It is important to remember that the low-FODMAP diet is NOT a wheat-free diet; however, I often encourage my clients to limit wheat intake when first getting started. Why? Because it’s easy to over consume wheat in one sitting, and many of the low-FODMAP servings sizes are often less than what is recommended on the label.  It may be a good idea to limit yourself to no more than one or two servings of wheat per day and pay extra attention to portion sizes.

What about potato bread, corn bread, and oat bread? Oat and oatmeal-based breads are made from wheat flour and oats and have been tested high FODMAP.  Potato bread is made from wheat flour and potatoes — this is an untested bread and probably best to avoid or test tolerance at one slice when symptoms are well managed. Corn bread is low FODMAP per Monash; however, the majority of corn breads are made with a combination of corn, wheat flour, and often whole corn kernels. Due to great variance in recipes, I would approach this bread type with caution.

Here is an example of a wheat bread that is low FODMAP at 1 slice.

Product
Sara Lee Classic White Wheat Bread

Ingredients
Enriched Wheat Flour [Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Reduced Iron, Niacin, thiamin Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Folic Acid], Water, Sugar, Yeast, Calcium Sulfate, Soybean Oil, Salt, Wheat Gluten, Preservatives (Calcium Propionate, Sorbic Acid), Enrichment (Calcium Sulfate, Vitamin E Acetate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3), Monoglycerides, Datem, Soy, Lecithin, Ferrous Sulfate, Citric Acid, Grain Vinegar, Potassium Iodate, Monocalcium Phospohate.

Gluten-Free Bread

While gluten-free bread does offer more low-FODMAP varieties than wheat bread, oftentimes you can find high-FODMAP ingredients like extracts or other FODMAP-heavy flours like rye or bean. Watch out for the tricky high FODMAP ingredients (see list below) as they are often added to gluten-free bread to boost flavor and fiber.

Here are a few examples of gluten-free low-FODMAP breads.

Product
Udi’s Gluten Free Delicious Soft White Sandwich Bread

Ingredients
Water, Tapioca Starch, Brown Rice Flour, Canola Oil, Potato Starch, Dried Egg White (egg White, Calcium Sulfate), Dried Cane Syrup, Tapioca Maltodextrin, Tapioca Syrup, Modified Food Starch, Yeast, Gum (xanthan Gum, Sodium Alginate, Guar Gum), Salt, Locust Bean Gum, Cultured Brown Rice, Brown Rice And Enzymes.

Product
Franz Gluten Free Mountain White Bread

Ingredients
Water, Brown Rice Flour, Tapioca Starch, Tapioca Syrup, Whole Grain Sorghum Flour, Xanthan Gum, Contains 2% or Less of Each of the Following: Whole Eggs, Whole grain Amaranth Seed, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Salt, Cultured Rice Flour, Yeast, Enzymes

Bread Ingredient Cheatsheet

Below are some common ingredients you’ll run into on both high and low-FODMAP bread labels. The Spoonful App takes care of a lot of this for you, but it always helps to know the nitty gritty.

Low vs High-FODMAP Ingredients

Low FODMAPHigh FODMAP
-Tapioca starch or tapioca flour
-Brown rice flour
-White rice flour
-Rice starch
-Potato starch or potato flour 
-Teff (flour)
-Cornmeal, corn flour, milled -corn, or masa harina
-Cornstarch
-Maize flour
-Millet (flour)
-Oats (flour)
-Quinoa (flour)
-Buckwheat (flour)
-Green banana flour
-Arrowroot (flour)
-Sorghum (flour)
-Psyllium husk powder
-Sugar 
-Maple syrup
-Yeast
-Seeds: chia, flax, pumpkin, sesame, sunflower
-Xanthan gum
-Apple cider vinegar
-Vinegar
-Soy protein
-Pea Starch*
-Chicory root
-Inulin
-Prune juice or prune juice concentrates
-Fruit juice or fruit juice concentrates
-Apple juice or fruit juice concentrate
-Pear juice or pear juice concentrate
-Soy flour
-Amaranth flour
-Bean-based flours such as navy bean and fava pea flour
-Rye (flour)
-Kamut (flour)
-Pumpernickel
-Spelt (unless spelt sourdough bread)
-Barley (flour)
-Coconut flour
-Chestnut flour
-Einkorn (flour)
-Emmer (flour)
-Lupin flour
-Freekah
-Triticale
-Wheat germ
-Pea fiber**
*While not tested by Monash, the definition of pea starch implies that it is low FODMAP. This is often added to some breads in very small quantities to improve texture of the bread.**This has not been tested by Monash and likely high FODMAP

Ingredients to Approach with Caution

Honey: there is a small low FODMAP serving size. If this is located low on the ingredient list it is likely low FODMAP and acceptable on the low FODMAP diet.

Agave: there is a small low FODMAP serving size. If this is located low on the ingredient list it is likely low FODMAP and acceptable on the low FODMAP diet.

Coconut sugar: there is a small low FODMAP serving size. If this is located low on the ingredient list it is likely low FODMAP and acceptable on the low FODMAP diet. 

Molasses: there is a small low FODMAP serving size. If this is located low on the ingredient list it is likely low FODMAP and acceptable on the low FODMAP diet. 

Malted Barley is sometimes added in very small portions to some breads, this is likely low FODMAP if located low on the ingredient list.

Almond flour or almond meal: this is likely low FODMAP if consumed in small portions and if located towards the end of the ingredient list. There is a low FODMAP serving size for almond flour.

Cassava flour: while not specifically tested, cassava is low FODMAP in small servings. This flour is likely low FODMAP if consumed in small portions or if located towards the end of the ingredient list.

Milk solids or dry milk solids: if sugar content is 1 gram or less this is unlikely providing excessive lactose. However, may approach with caution if sugar content is greater than 1 grams or listed towards the top of the ingredient list.

Raisin Bread: raisins are low FODMAP at one tablespoon. Limiting yourself to one slice of a low FODMAP raisin bread is likely falling within a low-FODMAP serving size.

Wheat flour: as mentioned above wheat flour used in bread making may be considered low FODMAP in small portions on severa wheat based foods, however wheat flour is  high FODMAP per Monash app. Opting for a gluten-free flour mix (made without high FODMAP ingredients) would be a better option when baking at home. 

Apple fiber: this has not been tested by Monash, however it does appear in a few certified low FODMAP breads.

Example of a Low, Moderate and High-FODMAP Bread

Source: Spoonful App

Low-FODMAP Certified Breads

If you want to be sure that the bread you’re choosing is 100% low FODMAP, I recommend reaching for something that has been certified by Monash or FODMAP Friendly. Here is a list of gut-friendly breads.

US Products

  • Schar Gluten Free Baguette
  • Schar Gluten Free Ciabatta Rolls
  • Schar Gluten Free Deli Style Seeded
  • Schar Gluten Free Deli Style Sourdough
  • Schar Gluten Free Multigrain Ciabatta Rolls
  • COBS Bread Low FOD Loaf

International Products

  • Baker’s Delight Wholegrain lowFOD Block Loaf
  • La Boulangrie Alternative Inewa 100% Spelt Sourdough
  • La Boulangrie Alternative Inewa 100% Spelt & Buckwheat
  • Brumby’s Bakery Quinoa and Linseed Low FODMAP Loaf
  • Ernst Bocker Gluten-Free Oat Bread
  • Ernst Bocker Gluten-Free Breakfast Rolls
  • Pure Life Bakery Organic Sprouted Khorasan
  • Pure Life Bakery Organic Sprouted Spelt
  • Pure Life Bakery Organic Sprouted  Sunflower Sourdough
  • Naturis Organic Bread Spelt Sourdough Wholemeal
  • Naturis Organic Bread Spelt Sourdough Wholemeal Chi & Sunflower Seeds
  • Good Mills Innovation GmBH Ancient Wheat 2am Wheat Rustic Country Loaf
  • Schar Gluten Free Wholesome White Loaf
  • Schar Gluten Free Wholesome Vitality Loaf
  • Schar Gluten Free Wholesome Vitality White Loaf
  • Schar Gluten Free Wholesome Seeded Loaf
  • Schar Gluten Free White Ciabatta Rolls
  • Schar Gluten Free Brown Ciabatta Rolls
  • Schar Gluten Free Seeded Ciabatta Rolls
  • Schar Gluten Free Panini Rolls
  • Schar Gluten Free Grissini
  • Alpine Breads Hemp Rising
  • Alpine Breads Sour Rye
  • Alpine Breads Tuscany Sourdough
  • Alpine Spelt & Barley sourdough
  • Alpine Spelt & Sprouted Grains
  • Alpine Breads Spelt Hot X Buns

Not Certified, but Likely Low-FODMAP Breads

  • Udi’s Gluten Free White Sandwich Bread
  • Franz Gluten Free Great Seed, 9 Grain, and Mountain White Bread
  • Canyon Bakehouse Gluten Free Country White Bread
  • Live G Free Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread
  • Trader Joe’s Gluten Free White Sandwich Bread

Bake Your Own

If you have some down, you can try making your own low-FODMAP bread. Here are a few amazing recipes to try.

And wouldn’t you know it? There is also a dedicated line of low-FODMAP baking producfts from Lo-Fo Pantry. Each of these has been certified by the FODMAP Friendly Food Program.

Takeaways

If choosing a wheat-based bread, opt for white wheat breads since they are likely lower in FODMAPs than high-fiber, whole wheat varieties. Remember to practice moderation and limit wheat consumption to avoid overfilling the FODMAP bucket with fructans.

Watch out for paleo, low carbohydrate, and keto-friendly breads as they often contain functional fibers such as chicory root fiber and inulin, fruit juices/purees, coconut flour, bean based flours, and cassava and almond flour in large portions

Check out the Monash App and FODMAP Friendly for a variety of certified low-FODMAP breads. More and more companies are having their products tested and this list continues to expand.

Categories
Low FODMAP

“FODMAPers Delight” Crossword Puzzle

Team Spoonful has been doing A LOT of crossword puzzles lately, so we thought: “Why not make our own?”. We know all of you are just chomping at the bit to solve a FODMAP-themed crossword, so to make the deal even sweeter, we’re giving away $50 of low-FODMAP pantry staples to the first 3 people who solve the puzzle (continental USA only).

Here’s how it works:

  1. Download and print the PDF and get solving!
  2. Once solved, snap a photo of the completed puzzle and tag @spoonfuleats on Instagram. Don’t have Instagram? Email it to support@spoonfuleats.com instead.
  3. If you’re one of the first 3 people to solve the puzzle, we’ll send $50 of low-FODMAP staples right to your door!

We hope everyone is finding fun, creative outlets during isolation time. Stay safe out there!

-Team Spoonful

Categories
Low FODMAP

Top 50 FODMAP Ingredients in Packaged Foods

One of the major challenges of starting a low FODMAP diet is finding new and interesting foods to try. In a perfect world, we’d all stick to the eat-this-not-that pamphlets passed out by our doctors, but after a few days of chicken and rice, those middle aisles become oh so tempting. We get it, and we got you!

Powered by the Spoonful app, we analyzed the labels of over 600,000 grocery products to give you the 50 most common ingredients that are moderate or high in FODMAPs.

Author’s note
We love creating data-driven posts like these, but they take time. If you’d like to see more of this type of content, let us know by leaving a comment or sharing the post on social. Thanks!

Maltitol is a sugar alcohol commonly used as a low-carb sweetener. You’ll find it in a lot of sugar-free candies, drinks, and bars. Like other sugar alcohols, maltitol is high in FODMAPs and should be avoided on a low-FODMAP diet.

Category

Polyol

Substitutes

Glucose Syrup, Pure Maple Syrup, Rice Malt Syrup, Cane Sugar, Palm Sugar, Brown Sugar, Beet Sugar, Common Table Sugar, Dextrose

45. Bread Crumbs

Found on 0.4% of labels

Bread crumbs on an ingredient label can be a little tricky, because the FODMAP load very much depends on the bread type. If the brand doesn’t spell out the bread’s ingredients, it was likely made from wheat, which can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size. If the bread crumbs came from gluten-free white bread or from sourdough, these are fair game, but make sure they contain no garlic or onion.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Sourdough Bread Crumbs, Gluten-Free Bread Crumbs

44. Green Onion, Scallions, Spring Onion

Found on 0.4% of labels.

Here’s a great example of how nuanced the low-FODMAP diet can be. As it turns out, green onions can be low or high FODMAP depending on which part you’re eating. In short, eat the tips and stay away from the bulb!

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Green Tips of Spring Onion, Green Tips of Leek, Green Tips of Scallion, Chive, Onion Infused Oil

Go for the tips, not the bulb! Source: MyKoreanKitch

43. Inulin

Found on 0.5% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Inulin is a fermentable fiber that occurs naturally in foods like onions, garlic and wheat. If you find inulin on a food label, it has likely been extracted from chicory root and is being used as an additive to boost fiber and sweetness. Unfortunately, inulin is a no-go on the low-FODMAP diet due to excessive fructans.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

42. Sour Cream

Found on 0.6% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Cream contains more milk fat and less lactose, which means it can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size. Defer to the Monash app for more details. Keep an eye out for Lactaid and Green Valley Creamery Lactose-Free Sour Cream if you want to consume a larger serving size.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

41. Rye, Rye Flour

Found on 0.6% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Rye is a cereal grain that is closely related to wheat and barley. Used in everything from bread to whiskey, rye is typically high in FODMAPs due to excess fructans, GOS and fructose. We recommend avoiding rye until your triggers are known.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan, GOS), Monosaccharide (Fructose)

Substitutes

Oat, Tapioca, Rice, Quinoa, Maize, Buckwheat, Millet, Polenta

40. Chicory Root

Found on 0.6% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Chicory root is commonly used as a coffee alternative, because it has a similar color and taste. Though it is a great source of water-soluble fiber, chicory root is high in FODMAPs at most serving sizes.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

39. Cherries

Found on 0.6% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Cherries, like many other fruits, are high in fructose, which makes them high in FODMAPs. Making a farmer’s market run? Pick up some fresh strawberries or blueberries instead!

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose), Polyol (Sorbitol)

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

Blueberries are a great, low-FODMAP fruit. Source: Pexels

38. Bananas (Ripe)

Found on 0.6% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Like other ingredients, bananas can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on maturity. Ripe bananas tend to amass more fructans in response to cold and drought, while unripe bananas have considerably less of a FODMAP load.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Banana (Unripe), Plantains

37. Green Bell Peppers

Found on 0.6% of labels

Green bell peppers have a low-FODMAP serving size, but still make our list due to high sorbitol levels in larger serves. Interestingly enough, red bell peppers are low FODMAP, so you can still get your bell pepper fix.

Category

Polyol (Sorbitol)

Substitutes

Red Bell Pepper, Bean Sprout, Carrot, Choy Sum, Eggplant, Kale, Tomato, Spinach, Zucchini

Reach for red bell peppers instead of green. Source: Pexels

36. Mangos, Mango Juice

Found on 0.7% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Mangos, like many other fruits, are high in FODMAPs due to excess fructose.

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose)

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

35. Peach

Found on 0.7% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Similar to mangos, peaches are high in FODMAPs and generally best to avoid. All peaches are high in sorbitol, but some varieties contain other FODMAPs. Clingstone peaches are high in mannitol and sorbitol, while white peaches are high in fructans and sorbitol.

Category

Polyol (Sorbitol)

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

34. Pumpkin

Found on 0.7% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Traditional pumpkin (including canned pumpkin) can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size. If you’re looking to mix pumpkin into a pie or bread recipe, we recommend checking the Monash for more details.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan), Oligosaccharide (GOS)

33. Mushrooms

Found on 0.8% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Mushrooms are often considered high in FODMAPs, but there are a few varieties such as oyster and canned champignons that have a relatively good-sized low FODMAP serve.

Category

Polyols (Mannitol)

Substitutes

Oyster Mushrooms, Shimeji Mushrooms, Black Fungi Mushrooms

32. Pears, Pear Juice

Found on 1.0% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Pears are high in FODMAPs due to excess fructose and sorbitol. Prickly pears, however, are low in FODMAPs.

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose), Polyol

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

31. Sorbitol

Found on 1.0% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Just like its sugar alcohol counterparts mannitol and xylitol, sorbitol is high in FODMAPs and should be avoided until your triggers are confirmed. Sorbitol is often found in sugar-free gum, mints, candies, and cough drops. Remember, real sugar is low FODMAP!

Category

Polyol

30. Beets, Beet Powder

Found on 1.0% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Beets can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on preparation and serving size. Pickled and canned beets contain less of a FODMAP load than fresh beets. If you’d like to learn more, we recommend the Monash app for more details.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan), Oligosaccharide (GOS)

Substitutes

Bean Sprouts, Carrot, Choy Sum, Eggplant, Kale, Tomato, Spinach, Zucchini

Eggplant is a great low-FODMAP veggie. Source: Pexels

29. Cashews

Found on 1.2% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Cashews, pistachios and almonds are all high in FODMAPs at moderate serves. You can still get nutty on low FODMAP though, just grab a handful of brazil nuts, peanuts or pecans!

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan), Oligosaccharide (GOS)

Substitutes

Brazil Nut, Chestnut, Peanut, Pecan, Pine Nut, Walnut

28. Raisins

Found on 1.2% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Raisins (aka dried grapes) and many other dried fruits are higher in FODMAPs than their fresh fruit counterpart. You can still enjoy fresh grapes though! They have a bountiful low-FODMAP serving size. Check the Monash app, there is a low FODMAP serving size for raisins so no need to completely avoid.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

27. Carob, Carob Bean, Carob Powder

Found on 1.4% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

If you’re on the hunt for something sweet, you might have come across carob, a sweet alternative to cocoa. Carob and carob powder are mostly used to make chocolate-like chips, because they are naturally sweeter than cocoa. Unfortunately, this sweetener should be limited while on the low-FODMAP diet.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

26. Durum, Durum Wheat

Found on 1.4% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Durum is a variety of spring wheat that is typically used to make pasta. It is the second most common variety, the first being wheat itself. Wheat and its derivatives all contain moderate fructan levels, and although low FODMAP is not a wheat-free diet, we recommend limiting its intake during the elimination phase.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Oat, Tapioca, Rice, Quinoa, Maize, Buckwheat, Millet, Polenta

Try alternative flours like tapioca. Source: Bob’s Red Mill

25. Semolina

Found on 1.5% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Used primarily in Middle-Eastern cuisine, semolina is a type of flour made from durum wheat. Like many other wheat varieties, semolina has a moderate FODMAP load, so we recommend limiting your intake during the elimination phase.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Oat, Tapioca, Rice, Quinoa, Maize, Buckwheat, Millet, Polenta

24. Buttermilk

Found on 2.1% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Did you know? Buttermilk contains no butter and is actually lower in fat than regular cow’s milk. It’s also lower in lactose, but unfortunately, that doesn’t keep it off our list.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

Substitutes

Lactose-free cow’s milk mixed with a souring agent such as lemon juice

23. Celery, Celery Seed

Found on 2.5% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Celery can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size. We recommend limiting celery during the elimination or until you understand your triggers.

Category

Polyols (Mannitol)

Substitutes

Bean Sprout, Carrot, Choy Sum, Eggplant, Kale, Tomato, Spinach, Zucchini

22. Fruit, Fruit Juice

Found on 2.5% of labels

Similar to other generic terms like flour or vegetable, fruit and fruit juice on a food label can be high or low FODMAP depending on the fruits in play. If the label doesn’t specify, we avoiding that product.

Category

Unclassified

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

21. Molasses

Found on 2.8% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Molasses is a sweetener made from boiling sugar beets and extracting the juice. It is considered high in FODMAPs in moderate and large servings, but there are lots of great sweetener alternatives out there like pure maple syrup and rice malt syrup. There is a small low FODMAP serving size for molasses so if you are using a small amount in a recipe or see it at the end of the ingredient list, it is likely low FODMAP.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan), Monosaccharide (Fructose)

Substitutes

Glucose Syrup, Pure Maple Syrup, Rice Malt Syrup

100% pure maple syrup is a great low-FODAMP sweetener. Source: Whole Foods

20. Almonds

Found on 3.1% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Almonds can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size, but it still makes the list. That being said, almondmilks are typically low in FODMAPs, because they contain very few almonds per serving.

Category

Oligosaccharide (GOS)

Substitutes

Brazil Nuts, Chestnuts, Peanuts, Pecans, Pine Nuts, Walnuts

19. Honey

Found on 3.2% of labels – high in FODMAPs

According to the US Sugar Association, honey is approximately 40% fructose — yikes! Luckily, there are plenty of low-FODMAP sweeteners out there. Check the Monash app since there is a low FODMAP serving size for honey, this has been updated in recent years so feel free to enjoy a small serving. Also, if you spot honey towards the end of the ingredient list and the sugar content is 7 grams or less, it falls within a low FODMAP serving size.

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose)

Substitutes

Glucose Syrup, Pure Maple Syrup, Rice Malt Syrup

18. Barley

Found on 4.3% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Known for being the world’s oldest cultivated cereal, barley is a staple of many diets — just not low FODMAP. If you’re looking for an alternative, try sprouted pearl barley. Many of the FODMAPs are removed during the sprouting process.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan, GOS)

Substitutes

Sprouted Pearl Barley

17. Coconut

Found on 4.4% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Fresh coconut, coconut milk, coconut water, and coconut sugar can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on the serving size – we recommend looking at the Monash app for more details. Coconut oil and coconut yogurt are typically low in FODMAPs, while coconut flour is high.

Category

Polyols (Sorbitol)

16. Apples, Apple Juice

Found on 4.4% of labels – high in FODMAPs

An apple a day keeps the doctor away… unless that doctor has put you on low FODMAP. Apples, applesauce and apple cider are all high in FODMAPs due to fructose, the sugar found in fruit. Apple cider vinegar, however, is low in FODMAPs.

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose), Polyols (Sorbitol)

Substitutes

Unripe Banana, Blueberry, Kiwi, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Papaya, Pineapple, Rhubarb, Strawberry

15. High Fructose Corn Syrup

Found on 4.6% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Present in many processed foods, high fructose corn syrup isn’t great for most diets, and low FODMAP is no exception. As you can imagine, HFCS is high in fructose, making it one to avoid during the elimination phase. Watch out for HFCS in sodas, there are some sugar-sweetened sodas if you are looking for a low FODMAP alternative.

Category

Monosaccharide (Fructose)

Substitutes

Glucose Syrup, Pure Maple Syrup, Rice Malt Syrup, Cane Sugar, Palm Sugar, Brown Sugar, Beet Sugar, Common Table Sugar, Dextrose

14. Chocolate

Found on 5.1% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

This one’s tricky. If you come across chocolate on a food label, the product contains lactose, which means it could be low or high in FODMAPs depending on serving size. Dark chocolate on the other hand, contains less lactose and therefore has a larger safe serving size. We recommend taking it easy on milk chocolate, but you can reach for dark chocolate in moderation.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

13. Peas

Found on 6.3% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Peas, including black eye peas and snow peas, are typically high in FODMAPs. Pea protein, however is likely not, so you can enjoy milks and other products made with pea protein. Just watch your intake of pea protein since it has been recently retested with mixed results. Feel free to enjoy pea protein if you have been tolerating it without issues.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan), Oligosaccharide (GOS)

Substitutes

Bean Sprout, Carrot, Choy Sum, Eggplant, Kale, Tomato, Spinach, Zucchini, Green Bean

12. Cream

Found on 7.1% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Cream contains more milk fat and less lactose than regular cow’s milk, but it is still something to watch out for until you know your triggers.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

11. Cocoa

Found on 7.4% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Cocoa (or cacao) can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on serving size – defer to the Monash app for more details. Cocoa used to flavor a food or beverage can be considered low FODMAP since it is present in smaller quantities.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan, GOS)

10. Whey, Milk Protein

Found on 8.5% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Whey is another name for the liquid by-product of cheese-making. FODMAP levels of whey and whey-based products depend on the amount of lactose left over from processing.

Want more information on FODMAPs and cheese? Check out this article by FODMAP Everyday.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

Substitutes

Hemp Protein, Egg Protein, Sacha Inch Protein, Pea Protein

9. Vegetable, Vegetable Juice

Found on 9.8% of labels

The term vegetable or vegetable juice on a food label is pretty vague and may include high FODMAP varieties like asparagus, cauliflower or peas. Unless specific vegetables are named as modifiers, we recommend avoiding this ingredient.

Category

Unclassified

8. Onion, Onion Powder

Found on 11% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Onion and its derivatives (onion powder, onion salt, etc.) are all high in FODMAPs. However, onions are not oil-soluble or fat-soluble, which means you can enjoy onion-infused oils from brands like Fody Foods.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Green Tips of Spring Onion, Green Tips of Leek, Green Tips of Scallion, Chive, Onion Infused Oil

Add shallot-infused olive oil to bring back that onion taste. Source: Fody Foods

7. Garlic, Garlic Powder

Found on 12% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Quite possibly the most difficult food to avoid while eating a low FODMAP diet, garlic is high in fructans in both whole and powder form. Garlic infused oils are low in FODMAPs, because fructans are not fat soluble.

Garlic does have a very small low-FODMAP serve, which makes some varieties of ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and other garlic-containing condiments safe in smaller portions.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

6. Wheat, Wheat Flour

Found on 16% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Although there is a small portion of wheat that is low in FODMAPs (refer to Monash for details), it is recommended to limit wheat, especially when in the elimination phase.

Wheat also comes in many varieties (durum, emmer, semolina, spelt, farina and farro) each of which should be considered moderate in FODMAPs so watch portion sizes.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

Substitutes

Oat, Tapioca, Rice, Quinoa, Maize, Buckwheat, Millet, Polenta

5. Flour

Found on 17% of labels

When “flour” in on the ingredient list, you should assume that the flour is wheat-based. And although there is a small portion of wheat that is low in FODMAPs, it is recommended to limit wheat especially when in the elimination phase.

If the flour is made from low-FODMAP grains such as oat, tapioca, rice or quinoa, then it is fair game.

Category

Oligosaccharide (Fructan)

4. Natural Flavors

Found on 18% of labels

If you see natural flavors on a food label, you’ll need to do a bit of digging. If the food is savory, it may contain ingredients such as garlic or onion, which are typically high in FODMAPs.

Sweet foods are less likely to contain trigger ingredients, and natural flavors present in quantities <2% of the total ingredients are unlikely to cause IBS symptoms.

When in doubt, we recommend calling the manufacturer to confirm which ingredients were used to create the natural flavor.

Category

Unclassified

3. Milk

Found on 20% of labels – high in FODMAPs

Cow’s milk, regardless of the fat content, is high in FODMAPs unless the packaging states that it is lactose-free or you see lactase enzyme listed as another ingredient.

If you come across milk on a cheese label, you’ll want to check the nutrition facts to see how many grams of added sugar (i.e. lactose) are present. According to Monash, cheeses with less than 1 gram of sugar are low lactose and therefore low FODMAP, barring any other FODMAP ingredients that may be present.

Category

Disaccharide (Lactose)

Substitutes

Lactose-Free Cow’s Milk

Lactose-free milk is a low-FODMAP refrigerator staple. Source: Lactaid

2. Soy, Soybean, Soy Flour

Found on 21% of labels – moderate in FODMAPs

Buckle up, this one’s a bit nuanced. Soy and soy-based products can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on preparation and bean maturity. In general, most foods containing soybeans are high in FODMAPs, but some varieties like firm tofu, tempeh, soy sauce, and edamame are low in FODMAPs.

Soy lecithin, a common emulsifier, is also considered low FODMAP.

Soymilk can be low FODMAP if made from soy protein, but soymilk made from soybeans, which is the most common type in the U.S., should be avoided.

1. Corn

Found on 24% of labels

Like soy, corn can be high or low in FODMAPs depending on preparation and serving size. We recommend avoiding corn as a vegetable (i.e. canned corn, corn kernels, corn on the cob) during the elimination phase as these foods contain high levels of sorbitol.

Foods made from corn starch or ground corn (corn tortillas, cereal, pasta, grits etc.), however, are low in FODMAPs and can be enjoyed however you like!

Category

Polyols (Sorbitol)

Substitutes

Bean Sprout, Carrot, Choy Sum, Eggplant, Kale, Tomato, Spinach, Zucchini

Summary & Advice

We hope this post serves as a useful starting point for low FODMAP label reading. Just remember — when you’re looking into a particular ingredient, its FODMAP content can vary based on both form and serving size. Ingredients like soy, corn, and milk are great examples of this.

And like always, we highly recommend working with a low FODMAP trained dietitian to make sure you get the nutrition you need while feeling confident in your food choices.

Happy grocery shopping!

Top 50 FODMAP Ingredients Found on Food Labels
Categories
Low FODMAP

Low FODMAP Recipes & Snacks using Pantry Basics

This week, we’re taking it back to the basics. Simple, heartwarming recipes centered around pantry staples. Now is the perfect time to cook more meals at home. Homemade meals are healthier, less expensive, and for those of us with children, it serves as a fun, off-screen activity. What a perfect time to teach our kids important cooking skills! At my house, we like to call this home economics

Above all, cooking is one constant that we can all enjoy as many of us around the world are practicing social distancing and self-quarantine. We hope you enjoy these recipes!

Simple Breakfast

The Best Low Fodmap Blueberry Muffins from FODMAP Everyday are perfect for breakfast or a quick snack. Maybe you can cook up a batch or two and freeze the extra for another day.

Source: fodmapeveryday.com

Overnight oats are my absolute favorite. There are so many ways to switch these up, just opt for what you have on hand. I love to make a few so I have a simple, healthy, and fiber-packed breakfast. My kids enjoy making these as well with their favorite fix-ins.

Looking to skip the overnight part? Cook up a batch of rolled or steel cut oats, and add your favorite low FODMAP toppings such as green-light serves of blueberries or strawberries, your choice of low FODMAP nuts, chia seeds, flax seeds, cinnamon, or a tablespoon of Craisins or raisins.

Want something with a touch of sweet? Check out these Mini Banana Pancakes by A Little Bit Yummy. Everyone in the family will enjoy this tasty breakfast!

Source: alittlebityummy.com

Low FODMAP Smoothies are fun to make and a wonderful way to boost your fiber intake with low FODMAP fruits, spinach, kale, flax seeds, chia seeds, nuts, seeds, small portions of avocado and oats. Here’s a great article and recipe to make your own low FODMAP smoothie from Patsy Catsos MS, RD, LDL at IBS- Free at Last. 

If you are looking to add some vegetables to your breakfast, try this Breakfast Red Bell Pepper + Egg Cups recipe by Kate Scarlata RDN. This recipe requires very few ingredients and tastes amazing!

Source: katescarlata.com

Yogurt parfaits made with lactose-free yogurt such as Green Valley Creamery Organics Lactose-Free Yogurt, Yoplait Lactose-Free, YQ by Yoplait, or Siggi’s Plain Lactose-Free Skyr Yogurt, one serving of your favorite low FODMAP fruit, and 1/4 cup low FODMAP granola such as Nature’s Path Pumpkin Seed + Flax Granola.

If you are in the mood to bake up some granola, try this easy Low Fodmap Maple Walnut Granola recipe by Fun Without FODMAPS. 

Source: funwithoutfodmaps.com

Cold cereal is always a safe fill-in if you don’t feel like using the stovetop or oven. There are lots of low FODMAP cereals out there:

  • Cheerios
  • Rice Chex
  • Kix
  • Barbara’s Puffins Original
  • EnviroKidz Organic Gorilla Munch Corn Puffs
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies*
  • Kellogg’s Frosted Krispies*
  • Kellogg’s Cocoa Krispies*
  • Kellogg’s Strawberry Krispies*
  • Kellogg’s Corn Flakes*
  • Kellogg’s Crispix*
  • Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes*

*Certified Low FODMAP by Monash

Top with 1/3 of a ripe banana or fresh strawberries and lactose-free milk, almond milk, oat milk, or your favorite low FODMAP milk alternative

What About Lunch?

Who doesn’t love egg salad. The Best Low-FODMAP Egg Salad by Rachel Pauls MD is tasty and simple to make.

Source: rachelpaulsfood.com

Chicken, tuna, and salmon salad mixed with a low FODMAP mayonnaise and put on top low FODMAP crackers or bread, cucumbers, carrots, or peppers is super easy. Check out our app for many brands to choose from.

Low FODMAP salads are always easy to whip up. Lettuce greens are low FODMAP so pile these on, toss in your favorite low FODMAP vegetables – carrots, cucumbers, bell peppers, sprinkle on some aged cheese and add a protein. Hard boiled eggs, leftover chicken (made without garlic or onions), 1/4 cup canned and drained chickpeas, or marinated tuna (see recipe above) all make your salad more satisfying.

You can always make a basic dressing using only olive oil and vinegar, FODY or LiveFreeFoods low FODMAP salad dressings, or check out this homemade low FODMAP salad dressing by Kate Scarlata RDN.

How about making your own adult version of a lunchable?  Here is my simple DIY Lunchable recipe. Combine a a few slices of deli meat (garlic and onion free), your favorite aged cheese, low FODMAP crackers, one serving of low FODMAP nuts, and one serving of a low FODMAP fruit. 

And when in doubt, how about a simple sandwich? Your choice of garlic and onion free deli meat, mayonnaise (try Hellmans’s or Best Foods mayo), brown or yellow mustard, a slice of cheese, and low FODMAP bread. 

What’s for Dinner?

This Miso Glazed Salmon by Everyday Nutrition will be a family favorite. Hopefully, you have some frozen salmon and condiments on hand to whip up this easy, yet fancy dish.

Source: everydaynutrition.com.au

These Turkey Stuffed Peppers by Patsy Catsos IBS-Free at Last look pretty simple to prepare and require only a few simple ingredients.

The Easy Chicken Quesadillas found at Patsy Catsos IBS-Free at Last website are a perfect make use of that leftover chicken or rotisserie chicken for an easy lunch or dinner.

Source: ibsfree.net

The Low Fodmap Tacos by the Monash University are packed with flavor, not FODMAPs. This is a perfect meal for families since everyone can add their own favorite toppings.

Pasta and Red Sauce – just pair your favorite gluten-free pasta (watch out for soy flour and high FODMAP bean based flours) and FODY marinara, Prego Sensitive, or Rao’s Sensitive Formula Marinara Sauce, or make your own low FODMAP red sauce like this one from FODMAP Everyday, Everyday Quick Tomato Sauce.

How about firing up the grill for some burgers? Look for unseasoned hamburger or turkey patties or a veggie burger such as the Original Sunshine Burger Garden Herb. Pair any of those with your favorite low FODMAP bun – Canyon Bakehouse, Trader Joe’s and Udi’s gluten free hamburger buns are all low FODMAP. Feel free to add a teaspoon of ketchup and yellow mustard if desired. 

Simple Sides

Baked potato – check out this article for some tasty ways to fancy up your spud. Potatoes are a great low FODMAP pantry staple to have on hand. 

This quick and easy Zucchini and Rice Slice found at the Monash University FODMAP blog requires only a few kitchen staples. Enjoy solo as snack or pair with a protein and low FODMAP vegetable for a quick meal. 

Kale chips have become a favorite in my house. Check out this easy “Cheesy” Kale Chip recipe by Kate Scarlata and feel good about sneaking in more vegetables into your diet. Nutritional yeast has become my favorite condiment!

Source: katescarlata.com

These Roasted Polenta Bites with Cheese & Herbs by the Monash University use only polenta, hard cheese, spices, and olive oil spray.

This Low Fodmap Grated Carrot Salad by FODMAP Everyday looks super easy and includes many simple ingredients that you likely already have at home. Carrots have a long shelf life and are rather inexpensive.

And in the case that you have extra carrots you may want to try this simple recipe by Lauren Renlund MPH, RD, Easy Roasted Carrots.

Marinated tofu is an easy protein that can be added to rice noodles, salads, stir fries, or just eaten by itself. This simple Tasty Marinated Tofu recipe by IBS Nutrition requires only a few basic pantry staples.

Source: ibsnutrition.com

For Your Sweet Tooth

I really appreciate simple ingredient recipes. This 3-ingredient Low Fodmap Peanut Butter Cookie recipe looks super easy! I am sure your family will enjoy this easy dessert.

Low FODMAP Coconut Macaroons by FODMAP Everyday are so yummy.

Source: fodmapeveryday.com

These Low FODMAP Frozen Banana Bites by A Little Bit Yummy are perfect. Just use the toppings that you have on hand at home.

Our Favorite Low FODMAP Snacks

Sometimes, y0u just don’t have the time (or, let’s face it, willpower) to prepare a home-cooked meal. When you need a quick fix, grab one of these low FODMAP staples.

  • String cheese or Babybel Cheese
  • Skinny Pop or any popcorn made with salt, butter, and oil
  • One small unripe banana and one tablespoon peanut or almond butter
  • Rice cakes with one tablespoon peanut or almond butter
  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Tortilla chips and FODY salsa
  • Glutino Gluten Free Pretzel Twists or Snyders Gluten Free Pretzel Sticks
  • One serving of low FODMAP nuts such as ten almonds or ten walnuts
  • Potato chips – stick with salted or sea salt since some flavors contain garlic and onion.
  • Seaweed – stick with the sea salt flavor since some flavors contain garlic and onion.
  • Low FODMAP fruits such as strawberries, cantaloupe, honeydew, clementines, oranges, and grapes. 
  • Edamame sprinkled with a little salt

Have you ever made your own hummus? This Traditional Hummus recipe by A Little Bit Yummy pairs perfectly with raw carrots, cucumbers, bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, and your favorite low FODMAP crackers.

Low FODMAP Snack Bars 

  • FODY Almond Coconut
  • FODY Dark Chocolate, Nuts& Sea Salt Bar
  • FODY Blueberry Almond Snack Bar
  • FODY Peanut Butter Chocolate Quinoa Bar
  • Nature Valley Crunchy Peanut Butter or Pecan Crunch
  • GoMacro Protein Replenishment, Protein Purity (minis), Everlasting Joy (minis), Protein Decadence, Sweet Awakenings, Whole Hearted Heaven, Prolonged Power, Balanced Goodness, Pure Promise Minis, Heart Warming Retreat Minis, Protein Pleasure Minis
  • 88 Acres Chocolate & Sea Salt Bar Nature Valley Crunchy Peanut Butter Granola Bar
  • FODY low FODMAP Snack Bar
  • Rachel Paul Happy Bar
  • Stellar Labs Protein Bars
  • Enjoy Life Chewy Bars Coco Loco, Crispy Grain & Seed Banana Caramel Bar,  Crispy Grain & Seed Chocolate Marshmallow Bar, and Crispy Grain & Seed Maple Sweet Potato Bar

Find Low FODMAP Pantry Essentials with Spoonful

Whether it’s a snack bar, pita chips or ketchup, find what you’re looking for on the Spoonful app. Available for iOS and Android. Just search “Spoonful”.

Categories
Low FODMAP

Low FODMAP Shopping & Meal Ideas during Coronavirus Shutdown

We are experiencing unprecedented times right now with the widespread concern of coronavirus (COVID-19). We are witnessing wiped-clean grocery shelves, rampant closures of schools, restaurants, sporting events, concerts, and more. This, along with long periods of social distancing, can put a strain on our emotional wellbeing and IBS symptoms.

If you are like me, an IBS sufferer, you may have additional concerns, such as not having low FODMAP foods available due to grocery store shortages, less access to exercise (a wonderful way to destress) due to fitness facility and yoga studio closures, and lack of toilet paper – this is a real concern!

Stress can negatively affect IBS symptoms as the gut and brain are strongly connected. Because of this, stress management is so important right now. Please find ways to unplug, relax, breathe, move your body, and focus on positive thoughts. Please give yourself a few hours break every day and disconnect from the media — the news can wait.

Meditation is a great form of stress relief. Source: Pexels

Here are a few helpful suggestions:

  • Meditation
  • Yoga – bonus, many poses can help with IBS.
  • Exercise – take a walk or run outside. Maybe stream a workout video from your TV, computer, or phone.
  • Call a friend or family member.
  • Write a letter.
  • Take a hot bath.
  • Try any of the many stress relief apps available such as CALM, Headspace, Simple Habit, Luminosity Mind, Aura, and more.

Being well-prepared with the basics

Many low FODMAPers purchase specialty products such as gluten-free breads, gluten-free pasta, low-FODMAP certified products, and more. Based on some personal communication and social media posts, there appears to be shortages of many of these foods in many cities nationwide.

It is important to remember that a low-FODMAP diet is not a gluten-free or dairy-free diet. While many low-FODMAP products are in fact gluten/dairy-free, you do not need to follow as restrictive of a diet as someone who has Celiac disease or a milk protein allergy. Please refer to the Monash app for safe servings of wheat and dairy as this will likely expand your options and reduce unnecessary shortages for those of us who really need these products. Listen to your health authorities and just try to keep the recommended amount of food on hand versus stockpiling.

Here are some staple low-FODMAP foods that have a longer shelf life:

  • Rice (any kind)
  • Rice noodles
  • Quinoa
  • Corn tortillas
  • White potatoes
  • Sourdough bread – watch portion and consider freezing to extend shelf life
  • Gluten-free flour
  • Frozen green beans
  • Broccoli – fresh or frozen
  • Carrots – fresh or frozen
  • Frozen blueberries and strawberries
  • Low FODMAP nuts- keep these in the freezer to keep fresh longer
  • Rice cakes
  • Popcorn
  • Peanut butter
  • Eggs
  • Frozen and canned seafood, poultry, and meat
  • Tofu and tempeh
  • Canned chickpeas and lentils
  • Oatmeal
  • Rice and oat based cereals 
  • Lactose-free milk*
  • Lactose-free yogurt* 
  • Almond or rice milk
  • Aged cheese
  • Garlic-infused oil
  • Butter

* Lactose-free dairy items often have a longer shelf life than regular dairy products. Check use by dates, you may want to buy a few extra right now.

If you need help finding low-FODMAP food products, check out the Spoonful app (iOS, Android). No need to scan every item, especially as we are trying to minimize physical contact. Just look for green highlighted foods in the Discover section to find low FODMAP foods.

You can also use the search bar to find specific low-FODMAP brands. For example, search bread and you will find several green highlighted options to choose.

Tip: Try to have a week or two worth of meal ideas planned to avoid buying too many non-perishable food items.

Online shopping and grocery delivery

There are also variety of grocery deliver services that may be servicing your hometown for a minimal charge.

  • Instacart
  • Google Express
  • Amazon Fresh
  • Peapod
  • Shipt
  • Click List

Online shopping – this is a great option, especially if you are searching for specialty foods and pantry staples. Here are some of my favorites.

Amazon

Check out FODMAP Everyday’s low FODMAP Amazon Shop for dozens of low-FODMAP food ideas.

Thrive Market

Thrive Online Market is a subscription-based online grocery store that sells many low-FODMAP foods. Check out the shop by diet link and click on low FODMAP or click here for many gut-friendly food items. Please note, Thrive Market is experiencing delays of 1-2 weeks due to heavy traffic.

Produce boxes

Are you looking for fresh produce and ways to reduce food waste? Check out these online produce boxes – Imperfect Foods, FreshDirect, Full Harvest, GrubMarket and FreshToHome. I hope that one of these amazing companies is selling to your zip code.

FODY Foods

FODY Foods sells low-FODMAP certified foods directly from their website and stores nationwide.  FODY states that everything is in stock online and available. FODY warehouse is based in Chicago, and orders typically arrive in 2-5 business days via FedEx.

Casa de Sante

Casa de Sante sells many certified low-FODMAP foods. The warehouse is located on the east coast, and orders are delivered in 2-3 days or longer based on your location. They have ample stock of their low-FODMAP spices, protein shakes, and more. 

Bars & snacks

Enjoy Life and Go Macro have many certified low FODMAP snack bars and treats available at grocers nationwide and online. These may be worth stocking up on as they are non-perishable and rather convenient. Go Macro offers a 20% off code for your first order online. Enjoy Life is running a bit late right now (todays orders will ship in 1 week per website) due to high demand.

Prepared Low-FODMAP Meal Services

Are you looking for already prepared low FODMAP meals? Rest assured these companies are taking all necessary precautions to ensure your food is safe, delicious, and on time.

ModifyHealth

ModifyHealth is operating to full capacity and able to meet the need of the communities with low-FODMAP meal deliveries nationwide. At this time, there are no challenges with their preferred route of deliveries. ModifyHealth delivers healthy, tasty low-FODMAP meals and they also offer telenutrition visits for those who need a FODMAP-trained RD to consult with to help them navigate all phases of the low-FODMAP diet. Please use the code myfodmapfriend for a discount.

ModifyHealth is a great low-FODMAP meal delivery service. Source: ModifyHealth

Epicured

Epicured delivers 5-star chef-developed low-FODMAP meals to the northeastern US. They are keeping up with orders and continue to provide high-quality low-FODMAP meal and snack options right to your door so you do not have to cook.

Stay safe!

We hope this article provides you with some useful tips to help you survive this challenging time while keeping your IBS symptoms in control.

Stay healthy out there and we wish you well.