Categories
Low FODMAP

Low FODMAP Cereal Guide: Hot, Cold, Granola & More

Finding a low FODMAP cereal can be a bit overwhelming as there are literally hundreds of options to choose from. Cereal products are often made from processed grains like wheat, oats, rice, and corn, which can be high or low FODMAP depending on portion size, processing, and of course, added ingredients.

In this article, I focus on cold cereals, granola, and hot cereals to appeal to all cereal lovers. As a FODMAP trained dietitian and low FODMAP product detective, let me help improve your label reading skills, while finding your new favorite breakfast treat. All to save you time and energy the next time you hit the cereal aisle.

New to FODMAPs? Check out our Ultimate Low FODMAP Food List – compiled by our team of registered dietitians from around the world.

Health Benefits of Cereal

Many cereals contain whole grains, which serve as a good source of fiber. Those who eat cereal in the morning are more likely to hit their daily fiber goal of 25-35 grams per day. Unfortunately, many of the high fiber, wheat-based cereals are high FODMAP (think Raisin Bran, All Bran, Shredded Wheat, and Bran Flakes).

While there are small portions of wheat-based foods allowed on the low FODMAP diet, many wheat-based cold cereals are high FODMAP when consumed in normal portion sizes. It is best to opt for corn (including cornmeal), oat, rice, or quinoa-based cereals since these grains are low FODMAP.

Tip: If you’re looking for a fiber boost, oat-based cereals will probably be your best option.

Many cereals are also fortified with extra vitamins and minerals including iron, folate, B6, B12 and others. Combine this with your favorite low FODMAP milk alternative or lactose free milk to start your day off with a nutrient dense breakfast.

Added Sugars

Many cereals are packed with several teaspoons of added sugar. While sugar is not a high FODMAP ingredient, many other sweeteners such as honey or agave can be added in portions that push it out of the low FODMAP range. Watch out for high fructose corn syrup and fructose on the ingredient list as well.

Cow’s Milk

Cold cereal is often paired with cow’s milk, which is high FODMAP due to the lactose content. I highly suggest the simple swap of lactose free milk for a very similar taste. Feel free to use a low FODMAP milk alternative if desired as there are plenty of non-dairy options available.

Certified Low FODMAP Cereals

Kellogg’s (Worldwide)

There are eight US based cereals from Kellogg’s that are certified low FODMAP at a serving size of one cup. These popular cereals are easy to find at your local grocery store.

*Special K not pictured
  • Kellogg’s Cocoa Krispies
  • Kellogg’s Corn Flakes
  • Kellogg’s Crispix
  • Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes.
  • Kellogg’s Frosted Krispies
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies (serving size is 1.5 cups)
  • Kellogg’s Special K Original
  • Kellogg’s Strawberry Rice Krispies

Carman’s (Australia)

Carman’s Fine Foods is one of the few companies offering a low FODMAP muesli (found in Australia).

  • Carman’s Crispy Deluxe Almond and Maple Gluten Free Muesli
  • Carman’s Original Fruit Free Muesli
  • Carman’s Super Berry Cranberry, Blueberry, and Goji Muesli 
  • Table of Plenty Balance + Muesli Fruit Free (found in Australia)

Freedom Foods (Australia)

  • Active Balance Buckwheat & Quinoa
  • Active Balance Multigrain & Cranberry
  • Maple Crunch Wholegrain with Sorghum
  • Rice Puffs

Sanitarium (Australia)

  • Weet-Bix Gluten Free 
  • Weet-Bix Gluten Free Coconut and Cinnamon

GoodMix (USA)

GoodMix Superfoods Blend 11 is a breakfast mix rich in superfoods such as chia, flax, buckwheat, cacao nibs and more that pairs well with most hot and cold cereals, yogurts, smoothies and more. 

Non-Certified Low FODMAP Cereals

The below products are all low FODMAP at a serving size of 1 cup. Many of these products are only found in the US, but some brands like General Mills, Quaker, and Kellogg’s can be found in grocery stores worldwide.

  • Annie’s Homegrown Organic Cocoa Bunnies Cereal
  • Annie’s Organic Cocoa Bunnies
  • Arrowhead Organic Maple Buckwheat Flakes Gluten Free
  • Arrowhead Puffed Rice Cereal
  • Back to the Roots Organic Stoneground Flakes and Organic Purple Corn Flakes
  • Barbara’s Puffins Peanut Butter & Chocolate or Peanut Butter
  • Cheerios- Regular, Multigrain, Chocolate, and Cinnamon
  • Environkidz Lightly Frosted Amazon Flakes, Cinnamon Jungle Munch, Panda Puffs, Leapin” Lemurs, and Gorilla Munch
  • Erewhon Gluten Free Corn Flakes, Crispy Brown Rice, and Honey Rice Twice Cereal
  • General Mills – Corn Chex, Chocolate Chex, Cinnamon Chex, Peanut Butter Chex, Rice Chex, and Vanilla Chex
  • General Mills Kix
  • Kellogg’s Corn Pops
  • Mom’s Best Crispy Cinnamon Rice and Crispy Cocoa Rice
  • Nature’s Path Rice Puffs, Crispy Rice, Honey’d Corn Flakes Cereal
  • One Degree Organic Foods Sprouted Brown Rice Crisps and Cacao
  • Peace Cereal Maple Pecan Clusters and Flakes
  • Peace Cereal Vanilla Almond Clusters & Flakes
  • Post Fruity Pebbles
  • Quaker Cap’N Crunch
  • Trader Joe’s Joe’s O’s Toasted Whole Grain Oats Cereal
  • Trader Joe’s Organic Corn Flakes

Low FODMAP Hot Cereals

For those looking for something hot, there are several options on the market. The majority of these products are packed with fiber and contain very little or no added sugar. These hot cereals are easy to prepare as well. Just add water, lactose free milk, or your favorite low FODMAP dairy alternative.

  • Ancient Harvest Quinoa Flakes
  • Arrowhead Gluten Free Rice and Shine Hot Cereal and Puffed Corn
  • Bob’s Red Mill Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal
  • Bob’s Red Mill White Corn Grits
  • Nabisco Cream of Rice or Instant Cream of Rice Gluten Free
  • Eden Organic Brown Rice Flakes Hot Cereal
  • Pocono Cream of Buckwheat
  • Bob’s Red Mill Corn Grits and Organic Brown Rice Farina Hot Cereal, High Fiber Oat Bran, Organic Creamy Buckwheat Hot Cereal

Want to be product agnostic? You’ve got plenty of low FODMAP grains to choose from.

  • Rolled Oats
  • Steel Cut Oats
  • Instant oats- ¼ cup serving size (watch out for individual serving packs as they often contain more than 23 grams – this pushes one out of the low FODMAP serving size)
  • Oat bran
  • Rice bran
  • Oat groats
  • Buckwheat groats
  • Grits – unflavored

Hot Cereal Toppers

I would also recommend adding a bit of sweet by topping your cereal with a low FODMAP fruit. Try any of these options with unripe banana, up to ten strawberries, a heaping ¼ cup of blueberries, or a handful of raspberries.

If you really want to sweeten it up, opt for one of these sugar alternatives:

  • Stevia – avoid those containing, inulin, chicory root or erythritol
  • Sucralose
  • Aspartame
  • Saccharin
  • Unfortunately, monk fruit has not been tested, therefore FODMAP content is unknown. Best to test tolerance when symptoms are under good control before using this sweetener.

Low FODMAP Granola

In general, it’s best to limit granola to a serving size of  1/4 cup to keep it at a low FODMAP.

  • Bakery on Main Organic Happy Granola Sprouted Maple Quinoa
  • Bear Naked Vanilla Almond Granola
  • Bob’s Red Mill Homestyle Coconut Spice Granola
  • Bob’s Red Mill Homestyle Maple Sea Salt Pan-Baked Granola 
  • Casa De Sante Granola- Oat Free Granola Golden Turmeric
  • Casa De Sante Granola – Artisan Savory Tuscan Herb and Indian Spicy Hot
  • Early Bird CHOC-A-DOODLE-DOO Granola  
  • Early Bird Kiss My Oats Granola
  • Marge Original, Blueberry Almond Flax, and Hazelnut Cacao Nibs Granola
  • Nature Valley Granola Crunch Cinnamon and Maple Brown Sugar
  • Nature’s Best Love Crunch Double Chocolate Crunch
  • Nature’s Path Hemp Hearts Granola
  • Nature’s Path Organic Chia Plus Coconut Chia Granola
  • Nature’s Path Pumpkin Seed & Flax Granola
  • Nature’s Path Vanilla Almond & Flax Granola
  • One Degree Sprouted Oat Cinnamon Flax Granola
  • One Degree Sprouted Oat Quinoa Cacao Granola
  • One Degree Sprouted Oat Vanilla Chia Granola
  • Purely Elizabeth Original Ancient Grains Granola- Blueberry Hemp, Original,  Cranberry Pecan, and Pumpkin Cinnamon, and Maple Almond Nut Butter.
  • Trader Joe’s Pecan Praline Granola

Enjoy your granola with your favorite lactose free milk or milk alternative or combine with a low FODMAP yogurt.

Quick Word About Muesli

Unfortunately, I have never spotted a low FODMAP muesli on the grocery stores shelves. Many muesli cereals contain high FODMAP dried fruits and too much honey. There are a few certified low FODMAP Muesli options in Australia or you can make your own. Here is an awesome low FODMAP muesli recipe from Alana Scott of A Little Bit Yummy.

Label Reading Advice for Cereals

If you come across any of the following ingredients on a product label, I recommend putting that cereal back on the shelf.

Tip: Tired of reading labels? Get instant feedback on the FODMAP content of products with the Spoonful mobile app

Moderate and High FODMAP Cereal Additives

  • Agave nectar in excess of 5 grams
  • Apple juice concentrates
  • Cashews
  • Chicory Root
  • Dates
  • Fructooligosaccharides (FOS)
  • Fructose
  • Fruit juice concentrates or purees 
  • Golden syrup in excess of 7 grams
  • High FODMAP dried fruit*
  • Honey in excess of 7 grams
  • Inulin
  • Pear Juice Concentrate
  • Pistachios
  • Soy Flakes
  • Sugar Alcohols – mannitol, sorbitol, lactitol, maltitol, isomalt, xylitol, and erythritol*

*Small portions of dried craisin or raisins sweetened with sugar are low FODMAP in small servings.

*Dried blueberries have not been tested for FODMAP content, however there is a certified low FODMAP bar that contains dried blueberries. Best to approach this dried fruit with caution when symptoms are under good control.

Moderate and High FODMAP Cereal Grains & Flours

  • Amaranth
  • Barley
  • Bean Based Flours
  • Black Beans and Black Bean Flours
  • Chickpeas and Chickpea Flours
  • Faba Beans and Faba Bean Flours
  • Navy Beans and Navy Bean Flours
  • Einkorn
  • Hard Red Wheat
  • Rye
  • Spelt
  • Triticale
  • Wheat
  • Wheat berries
  • Wheat bran
  • Whole wheat

Molasses, Barley Malt, & Natural Flavors

Often I spot molasses, barley malt, and malt extract on the ingredient list. These ingredients are unlikely to cause issues since they are added in very small portions. Likewise, “natural flavors” in cereals are commonplace and do not need to be avoided. Natural flavors are more of concern in savory foods where they may contain onion or garlic.

We hope that this comprehensive cereal list gives you plenty of new options to choose from! Remember that you can also use the search option on the Spoonful app to find low FODMAP cereal options. Happy shopping!

By Vanessa Vargas, RD

Vanessa Cobarrubia is a FODMAP trained dietitian in Bend, Oregon. She specializes in gastrointestinal nutrition with a focus on irritable bowel syndrome, small intestinal bacteria overgrowth, inflammatory bowel diseases, and nutrition support. Vanessa had suffered for years with IBS before discovering the low FODMAP diet. She enjoys teaching other IBS sufferers how to navigate the low FODMAP diet with individual nutrition counseling and contributing to the FODMAP community with articles, grocery lists, and more.

11 replies on “Low FODMAP Cereal Guide: Hot, Cold, Granola & More”

Yay! My favorite granola from Costco made the list. I was pretty sure it wasn’t bothering me, but nice to know it checked out for you as well. Thank you so much for giving us an updated cereal list.

Thanks for the post. It was very informative and enlightening. I’m still learning and reading labels is foreign to me. This helped so again thanks.

Thank you, Vanessa, for this very comprehensive list of cereals. Cereal has been my mainstay for the last few years.

I love the app and updates. I’m struggling to find a good, affordable pasta. Is there a recommendation you can make?

Hey Julie – most gluten free pastas will do the trick! Have you tried Miracle Noodle – we’re big fans of them.

Thank you for the information. I found it very informative, especially ingredients to look for and stay away from when reading labels.

I have been looking for this info for months. I sent a note to Bobs Red Mill because I love the company and mission. I and asked them which products are considered low FODMAP and they wouldn’t answer me. They suggested I ask a doctor because they are not medical professionals.
This is sad! Is there a way to communicate with these big brands and let them see how amazing the app is and how comprehensive your articles are. Thank you for all this info – VERY NICE TO HAVE!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *